COVID 19

What you need to know

  • People who are fully vaccinated against Covid-19 in the US can resume travel at low risk to themselves, the CDC said Friday in an update to their travel guidance.
  • Pfizer/BioNTech says its coronavirus vaccine’s protection lasts at least six months — far longer than the 90 days that had been the best estimate previously offered.

US continues to administer more than 3 million Covid-19 vaccine doses a day, according to CDC data

From CNN’s Naomi Thomas

Andrea Moore sits as her mother, Alma Penn receives her Covid-19 vaccine in the gymnasium at Whitney M. Young Elementary School on April 2 in Louisville, Kentucky. 
https://www.cnn.com/world/live-news/coronavirus-pandemic-vaccine-updates-04-04-21/index.htmlAndrea Moore sits as her mother, Alma Penn receives her Covid-19 vaccine in the gymnasium at Whitney M. Young Elementary School on April 2 in Louisville, Kentucky.   Jon Cherry/Getty Images

About 165 million doses of Covid-19 vaccine have been administered in the United States, according to data published Sunday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC reported that 165,053,746 total doses have been administered, about 79% of the 207,891,295 doses delivered.

That’s about 3.4 million more administered doses reported since yesterday, for a 7-day average of about 3.1 million doses per day.

About 32% of the population – 106 million people – have received at least one dose of the vaccine, and 18.5% of the population – about 61 million people – have been fully vaccinated.

To note: Data published by the CDC may be delayed, and doses may not have been given on the day reported.

How Many Coronaviruses Are There?

Coronaviruses didn’t just pop up recently. They’re a large family of viruses that have been around for a long time. Many of them can cause a variety of illnesses, from a mild cough to severe respiratory illnesses.

The new (or “novel”) coronavirus is one of several known to infect humans. It’s probably been around for some time in animals. Sometimes, a virus in animals crosses over into people. That’s what scientists think happened here. So this virus isn’t new to the world, but it is new to humans. When scientists found out that it was making people sick in 2019, they named it as a novel coronavirus.

Human Coronavirus Types

Scientists have divided coronaviruses into four sub-groupings, called alpha, beta, gamma, and delta. Seven of these viruses can infect people:

  • 229E (alpha)
  • NL63 (alpha)
  • OC43 (beta)
  • HKU1 (beta
  • MERS-CoV, a beta virus that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)
  • SARS-CoV, a beta virus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
  • SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19

Virus Changes

Coronaviruses have all their genetic material in something called RNA (ribonucleic acid). RNA has some similarities to DNA, but they aren’t the same.

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